On the “cannibalisation” of Key Stage 3 | Administrator

Ofsted’s new Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, gave a speech at the Festival of Education in June 2017 in which she trumpeted the importance of the school curriculum.

She said that, all too often, schools lose sight of the real substance of education: “Not the exam grades or the progress scores, important though they are, but instead the real meat of what is taught in our schools and colleges: the curriculum.”

She said that, although it’s true that education has to prepare young people to succeed in life and make their contribution in the labour market, “to reduce education down to this…

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On the “cannibalisation” of Key Stage 3 | Administrator

Ofsted’s new Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman, gave a speech at the Festival of Education in June 2017 in which she trumpeted the importance of the school curriculum.

She said that, all too often, schools lose sight of the real substance of education: “Not the exam grades or the progress scores, important though they are, but instead the real meat of what is taught in our schools and colleges: the curriculum.”

She said that, although it’s true that education has to prepare young people to succeed in life and make their contribution in the labour market, “to reduce education down to this…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2sPp6G1

Literacy empowers (Pt2): Why every teacher is a teacher of literacy | Administrator

This article was written for SecEd magazine and first published in June 2017.  You can read the original version on the SecEd website here.  
You can read more of my monthly columns for SecEd here. 

Last time I made the case for literacy as a cross-curricular concern, arguing – as did George Sampson in 1922 – that “every teacher is a teacher of English because every teacher is a teacher in English”.

I also said that as a teacher of, say, science, you have a responsibility to help your pupils learn about science, but you also have a responsibility to help them speak, listen, read and…

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Literacy empowers (Pt1): Why every teacher is a teacher of literacy | Administrator

This article was written for SecEd magazine and first published in June 2017.  You can read the original version on the SecEd website here.  
You can read more of my monthly columns for SecEd here. 

Literacy empowers. Y Kassam’s 1994 paper Who Benefits from Illiteracy? argues that: “To be literate is to gain a voice and to participate meaningfully and assertively in decisions that affect one’s life.”

“To be literate,” Kassam goes on, “is to gain self-confidence. To be literate is to become self-assertive. Literacy enables people to read their own world and to write their own history….

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Closing the literacy gap | Administrator

I have the privilege of speaking at the Reading Matters ‘Closing the Literacy Gap’ conference in Bradford on 29 June.

Ahead of that event, and to whet your appetite, I’d like to share some strategies for closing the gap between our word-rich and word-poor pupils so that all of them – irrespective of their starting points and backgrounds – develop the knowledge and skills needed to access and excel across the whole school curriculum…
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In their 2012 report ‘Moving English Forward’, Ofsted said that “There can be no more important subject than English in the school curriculum.”

Why?…

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When is revision not revision? | Administrator

This article was written for The Association of Colleges’ website to promote my workshop in London in April.  

I have the pleasure of delivering a workshop for AoC Create in London in April on the subject of teaching English re-sits at post-16.

According to Ofsted, “Too much teaching in [post-16] English is not good enough.”

In the OECD’s 2015 global rankings, England placed 22nd out of 24 nations for literacy.

Recent GCSE results in the further education sector have been poor, with only 6.5% of learners achieving a grade C or above in English.

This should come as no surprise,…

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Developing classroom practice | Administrator

This article was written for Creative Education to promote my speech at their national Teaching and Learning conference in March 2017.

Think of something you’re good at. How did you become good at it?

How do you know you’re good at it – on what evidence is your judgment based?

Now think of something you’re not very good at and consider why – what went wrong when you were trying to learn this thing and who, if anyone, was to blame?

Next, think about something you are good at now but didn’t initially want to learn. What kept you going in lieu of motivation?

Finally, think of a time…

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