The Active Ingredients of Great Teaching | classteaching

At DMAT, we have moved away from a ‘tick-box’ approach to teaching and have embraced a ‘tight but loose’ approach.  We want teaching to be tight, in terms of focusing on sound , evidence-informed pedagogical principles, but loose in terms of how this is interpreted in classrooms.  For example, how a PE teacher models throwing a javelin will be very different to how a history teacher models how to write a discursive essay.  We do not talk about ‘outstanding’ teaching and we do not grade lessons; instead we talk about great teaching and how all teachers can get that little bit better.

We have…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2S5p6MQ

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The Active Ingredients of Great Teaching | classteaching

At DMAT, we have moved away from a ‘tick-box’ approach to teaching and have embraced a ‘tight but loose’ approach.  We want teaching to be tight, in terms of focusing on sound , evidence-informed pedagogical principles, but loose in terms of how this is interpreted in classrooms.  For example, how a PE teacher models throwing a javelin will be very different to how a history teacher models how to write a discursive essay.  We do not talk about ‘outstanding’ teaching and we do not grade lessons; instead we talk about great teaching and how all teachers can get that little bit better.

We have…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2S5p6MQ

Focus on Feedback | classteaching

Earlier this week Fran Haynes wrote a great blog on the Durrington Research School site, exploring the research evidence around effective feedback. You can read it here. This completes a series of blogs this half term on the six pedagogical principles that shape our approach to teaching here at Durrington.

In ‘What does it look like in the classroom?‘ by Carl Hendrick and Robin Macpherson, Dylan Wiliam makes some typically insightful comments about feedback:
“Make feedback into detective work.”
“…the major purpose of feedback should be to improve the student.”
“Just one sentence…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2DBeNLy

Focus on Feedback | classteaching

Earlier this week Fran Haynes wrote a great blog on the Durrington Research School site, exploring the research evidence around effective feedback. You can read it here. This completes a series of blogs this half term on the six pedagogical principles that shape our approach to teaching here at Durrington.

In ‘What does it look like in the classroom?‘ by Carl Hendrick and Robin Macpherson, Dylan Wiliam makes some typically insightful comments about feedback:
“Make feedback into detective work.”
“…the major purpose of feedback should be to improve the student.”
“Just one sentence…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2DBeNLy

The Importance of Questioning | classteaching

 

As Andy Tharby and Shaun Allison argue good questioning is a fundamental but “ubiquitous” and “fluid” part of the learning process. Effective questioning should also allow teachers to formatively assess students understanding of a new concept, motivate students to engage in their learning and encourage students to ask their own questions, as such the quality of questioning can make or break a lesson. The question must be asked then – how can we make sure our questioning is effective?
Cold Calling:

Lemov refers to the ‘culture of engaged accountability’ where every student knows that it…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2TyLtfe

The Importance of Questioning | classteaching

 

As Andy Tharby and Shaun Allison argue good questioning is a fundamental but “ubiquitous” and “fluid” part of the learning process. Effective questioning should also allow teachers to formatively assess students understanding of a new concept, motivate students to engage in their learning and encourage students to ask their own questions, as such the quality of questioning can make or break a lesson. The question must be asked then – how can we make sure our questioning is effective?
Cold Calling:

Lemov refers to the ‘culture of engaged accountability’ where every student knows that it…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2TyLtfe

Supporting Practice | classteaching

Practice is an essential element in the acquisition of learning something new. Practice is utilising, applying, enacting, thinking about, writing about or speaking about new knowledge and skills so that can be consolidated or enhanced. To learn how to do something students must have the opportunity to practice. In The Hidden Lives of Learners, Graham Nuthall suggests students need to encounter something a minimum of three times if they are going to remember it. Therefore, it is our job as teachers to give students opportunities to practise what is required of them in order to succeed in our…

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http://bit.ly/2WwKPRe