Is social-emotional learning linked to academic performance? | IEE

A study published in Contemporary Educational Psychology looks at the benefits of a school-based social and emotional learning (SEL) intervention in relation to academic achievement by examining how the four main components that underlie the SEL model (children’s social-emotional competence, school connectedness, mental health problems and academic achievement) interact over time.

Margarita Panayiotou and colleagues from Manchester
Institute of Education used data drawn from a major cluster randomised trial of
the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) curriculum…

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http://bit.ly/2GQOELR

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Is social-emotional learning linked to academic performance? | IEE

A study published in Contemporary Educational Psychology looks at the benefits of a school-based social and emotional learning (SEL) intervention in relation to academic achievement by examining how the four main components that underlie the SEL model (children’s social-emotional competence, school connectedness, mental health problems and academic achievement) interact over time.

Margarita Panayiotou and colleagues from Manchester
Institute of Education used data drawn from a major cluster randomised trial of
the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) curriculum…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2GQOELR

Effects of youth mentoring programmes | IEE

Mentoring programmes that pair young people with non-parental adults are a popular strategy for early intervention with at-risk youth. To examine the extent to which these types of interventions improve outcomes for young people, Elizabeth B Raposa and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of outcome studies of one-to-one youth mentoring programmes written in English between 1975 and 2017.

Their analysis included 70 studies with a sample size of
25,286 children and young people (average age = 12 years), and considered five
broad outcome categories: school, social, health,…

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http://bit.ly/2SLF2cj

An evaluation of PACE Center for Girls | IEE

Megan Millenky and colleagues from MDRC have released a new reporton an evaluation of PACE Center for Girls. PACE, a Florida-based organisation, provides academic and social services to at-risk middle and high school girls. According to the report, PACE operates daily, year-round; on a typical day, girls attend academic classes and receive additional support such as individual counselling, academic advice, and referrals to other services.

The research team used a random
assignment design to evaluate the impact of PACE. From August 2013 to November
2015, a sample of 1,125…

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http://bit.ly/2DVp991

Evidence of disciplinary bias against sexual minority females | IEE

LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning) pupils
are coming out at earlier ages and becoming more visible in schools, creating a
need for research on their educational experiences and outcomes. Exclusionary
bias studies, which look at the proportions of pupils suspended or expelled,
have historically focused on the bias against pupils of colour, yet sexual
minority pupils face similar risks.

Joel Mittleman of Princeton University introduced a new data source for research on sexual minority pupils: The Fragile Families and Childhood Wellbeing Study. It is…

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http://bit.ly/2SJl0iK

The effect of a World Cup on pupils’ effort and achievement | IEE

A study published in the Journal of Public Economics examines how leisure time can impact pupils’ effort and educational achievement by looking at the overlap of major football tournaments (the FIFA World Cup and the UEFA European Championship) with GCSE exams in England.

Using seven years of subject data on pupils in England,
taken from the National Pupil Database, Robert Metcalfe and colleagues
estimated the overall effect of a tournament by comparing within-pupil
variation in performance during the exam period between tournament and
non-tournament years.

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http://bit.ly/2DSZ3n9

Effects of youth mentoring programmes | IEE

Mentoring programmes that pair young people with non-parental adults are a popular strategy for early intervention with at-risk youth. To examine the extent to which these types of interventions improve outcomes for young people, Elizabeth B Raposa and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of outcome studies of one-to-one youth mentoring programmes written in English between 1975 and 2017.

Their analysis included 70 studies with a sample size of
25,286 children and young people (average age = 12 years), and considered five
broad outcome categories: school, social, health,…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2SLF2cj