Battle of the Jabberwockys | jonnywalkerteaching

There are plenty of readings of Lewis Carroll’s ‘The Jabberwocky’ out there, ranging from the frumious to the tulgey. But whose is best? As the self-declared authority on all things mimsy, I declare this countdown to be perfectly valid.

The Muppets

Strengths: Strong borogove game. Better than average toves, though not slithy enough for my liking.

Weaknesses: The boy narrating his own story – what’s that about. Also, the fact that the boy and the Jabberwocky say the word ‘whiffle’. Get that mess out of here, Henson.

Verdict: 1/9 – I was ready to love it, still reeling as I am from…

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Battle of the Jabberwockys | jonnywalkerteaching

There are plenty of readings of Lewis Carroll’s ‘The Jabberwocky’ out there, ranging from the frumious to the tulgey. But whose is best? As the self-declared authority on all things mimsy, I declare this countdown to be perfectly valid.

The Muppets

Strengths: Strong borogove game. Better than average toves, though not slithy enough for my liking.

Weaknesses: The boy narrating his own story – what’s that about. Also, the fact that the boy and the Jabberwocky say the word ‘whiffle’. Get that mess out of here, Henson.

Verdict: 1/9 – I was ready to love it, still reeling as I am from…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2t6SpGc

Social Anthropology in the Primary Classroom | jonnywalkerteaching

Part One of Two

I am increasingly convinced that social anthropology is a useful discipline in the primary school. For pupils, this approach – which seeks deep understanding of culture without an ethnocentric lens – could enable them to develop criticality and analysis, whilst building their worldliness and appreciation of difference.

For teachers, it can be a vehicle to contemplate the huge question of belonging, identity and difference that permeate the books we share with children, the topics we include in our curricula and the kinds of questions that pupils ask us.

Also, it afford a…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2rsJ6R5

Social Anthropology in the Primary Classroom | jonnywalkerteaching

Part One of Two

I am increasingly convinced that social anthropology is a useful discipline in the primary school. For pupils, this approach – which seeks deep understanding of culture without an ethnocentric lens – could enable them to develop criticality and analysis, whilst building their worldliness and appreciation of difference.

For teachers, it can be a vehicle to contemplate the huge question of belonging, identity and difference that permeate the books we share with children, the topics we include in our curricula and the kinds of questions that pupils ask us.

Also, it afford a…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2rsJ6R5

Teaching the Platypus | jonnywalkerteaching

“Of all the Mammalia yet known it seems the most extraordinary in its conformation; exhibiting the perfect resemblance of the beak of a Duck engrafted on the head of a quadruped.”

Back when the platypus was first ‘discovered’ by scientists and recorded as a species, it was considered a hoax. Back then, it was fairly modish to graft bits of different animals together to try to convince people that they were real.

Faced with a furry looking egg-laying mammal with paws and the beak of a duck, the Platypus defied and subverted the existing categorisation; birds have beaks, this is no bird,…

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http://ift.tt/2roewbu

Teaching the Platypus | jonnywalkerteaching

“Of all the Mammalia yet known it seems the most extraordinary in its conformation; exhibiting the perfect resemblance of the beak of a Duck engrafted on the head of a quadruped.”

Back when the platypus was first ‘discovered’ by scientists and recorded as a species, it was considered a hoax. Back then, it was fairly modish to graft bits of different animals together to try to convince people that they were real.

Faced with a furry looking egg-laying mammal with paws and the beak of a duck, the Platypus defied and subverted the existing categorisation; birds have beaks, this is no bird,…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2roewbu

All That I’ve Written About Reading (So Far…) | jonnywalkerteaching

This is just a signpost towards all the stuff I have written about reading. More recently, I have been getting far more interested in the process, culture and love of reading, so this is a good time to collate what’s gone before, since I expect I’ll be writing about it a whole lot more from now on!

 

The Feeling of Reading – May 2017 – What is it that we can do to generate that transcendent feeling that comes about when we are being read to, and being read to well. How can we summon that almost mythical hush that comes about from having a room of people all engaged in storytelling?

Dahl…

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http://ift.tt/2sSmjLG