The Great Gatsby: complete notes and timeline. | jwpblog

No matter how often I teach Gatsby I find it hard. Each time, the ambiguity of the central character and the lack of sympathy I have for anyone in the text get in my way. As I prepare to work on it again for my OCR A level class, I thought I’d summarise my thoughts to date using a setting and character approach.  Hence the recent raft of posts. Here I post the whole notes document in PDF and a timeline of events in the novel alongside the contextual timeline for Fitzgerald and the USA.

2gatsby notes

2timeline of Gatsby

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Notes on Chapter 9 of The Great Gatsby | jwpblog

Chapter 9

In the final chapter, the last rites are read over the fantastic life of Jay Gatsby – artificial, noble and a perpetual outsider.

Nick tells the story from the perspective of 1924, the time of writing and two years after the events. Certainly nobody wishes to be associated with the dead man – Daisy sends no flowers, Wolfshiem proves impossible to pin down, though he professes sadness and nobody appears at the funeral aprt from Owl-eyes, the one-time guest, and Henry C. Gatz, his father.

The opportunity for truths to emerge at the inquest is not taken and Myrtle’s sister…

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Notes on Chapter 8 of the Great Gatsby. | jwpblog

Chapter 8:

Tom, Daisy and Jordan have no further role in the narrative beyond that required to tie up loose ends. The novel now focuses on Gatsby as seen through the eyes of Nick. The glamour and overt drama is complete and what now happens, happens in the manner of a Greek Tragedy – told and described but not seen on stage.

Setting:

Nick’s patchy sleep is disturbed by a fog horn all night, recalling the complex and confusing emotions at play in his head and in the head of Gatsby who has returned home during the night and now has the chance to recount the early life history referred to…

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Notes on Chapter 7 of The Great Gatsby | jwpblog

Chapter 7:

The crunch! The longest chapter covering the disintegration of the dream and the betrayal of love and acceptance of material, rather than emotional wealth.

 

Setting:

There are several settings in this chapter – the empty Gatsby mansion, the train, the Buchanan’s mansion, the plaza suite, the cars, the garage interior and a micro setting in the Buchanan’s kitchen. The weather is now stifling hot- a typical New York late summer which is used to increase the feeling of discomfort and pressure on the characters. Daisy may be joking when she hopes for 5 iced baths in the Plaza,…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2wZVtmj

Notes on Chapter 7 of The Great Gatsby | jwpblog

Chapter 7:

The crunch! The longest chapter covering the disintegration of the dream and the betrayal of love and acceptance of material, rather than emotional wealth.

 

Setting:

There are several settings in this chapter – the empty Gatsby mansion, the train, the Buchanan’s mansion, the plaza suite, the cars, the garage interior and a micro setting in the Buchanan’s kitchen. The weather is now stifling hot- a typical New York late summer which is used to increase the feeling of discomfort and pressure on the characters. Daisy may be joking when she hopes for 5 iced baths in the Plaza,…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2wZVtmj

The Great Gatsby: complete notes and timeline. | jwpblog

No matter how often I teach Gatsby I find it hard. Each time, the ambiguity of the central character and the lack of sympathy I have for anyone in the text get in my way. As I prepare to work on it again for my OCR A level class, I thought I’d summarise my thoughts to date using a setting and character approach.  Hence the recent raft of posts. Here I post the whole notes document in PDF and a timeline of events in the novel alongside the contextual timeline for Fitzgerald and the USA.

2gatsby notes

2timeline of Gatsby

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2wMMzJm

Notes on Chapter 9 of The Great Gatsby | jwpblog

Chapter 9

In the final chapter, the last rites are read over the fantastic life of Jay Gatsby – artificial, noble and a perpetual outsider.

Nick tells the story from the perspective of 1924, the time of writing and two years after the events. Certainly nobody wishes to be associated with the dead man – Daisy sends no flowers, Wolfshiem proves impossible to pin down, though he professes sadness and nobody appears at the funeral aprt from Owl-eyes, the one-time guest, and Henry C. Gatz, his father.

The opportunity for truths to emerge at the inquest is not taken and Myrtle’s sister…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2vYB1oR