From Focused to Thorough processing: the mindshift that will enhance your students’ learning | Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Applied Linguistics), MA (TEFL), MA (English Lit.), PGCE (Modern Languages and P.E.)

(authored with Dylan Vinales )
1.The attributes of effective aural and written input
In my posts I often point out how, in my view, for the input we give our beginner L2 learners in aural and written texts to truly enhance learning, it ought to satisfy the following criteria:
It has to be comprehensible – i.e. the learners should be able to access 95 % of it without resorting to the use of dictionaries or other resources.
it has to be highly patterned and repetitive – i.e. the text(s) ought to contain as many occurrences as possible of the target phonological, lexical and structural…

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http://ift.tt/2A1eg5s

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From Focused to Thorough processing: the mindshift that will enhance your students’ learning | Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Applied Linguistics), MA (TEFL), MA (English Lit.), PGCE (Modern Languages and P.E.)

(authored with Dylan Vinales )
1.The attributes of effective aural and written input
In my posts I often point out how, in my view, for the input we give our beginner L2 learners in aural and written texts to truly enhance learning, it ought to satisfy the following criteria:
It has to be comprehensible – i.e. the learners should be able to access 95 % of it without resorting to the use of dictionaries or other resources.
it has to be highly patterned and repetitive – i.e. the text(s) ought to contain as many occurrences as possible of the target phonological, lexical and structural…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2A1eg5s

From Focused to Thorough processing: the mindshift that will enhance your students’ learning | Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Applied Linguistics), MA (TEFL), MA (English Lit.), PGCE (Modern Languages and P.E.)

(authored with Dylan Vinales )
1.The attributes of effective aural and written input
In my posts I often point out how, in my view, for the input we give our beginner L2 learners in aural and written texts to truly enhance learning, it ought to satisfy the following criteria:
It has to be comprehensible – i.e. the learners should be able to access 95 % of it without resorting to the use of dictionaries or other resources.
it has to be highly patterned and repetitive – i.e. the text(s) ought to contain as many occurrences as possible of the target phonological, lexical and structural…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2A1eg5s

From Focused to Thorough processing: the mindshift that will enhance your students’ learning | Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Applied Linguistics), MA (TEFL), MA (English Lit.), PGCE (Modern Languages and P.E.)

1.The attributes of effective aural and written input
In my posts I often point out how, in my view, for the aural and written input we give our beginner L2 learners in aural and written texts to truly enhance learning, the input ought to satisfy the following criteria:
It has to be comprehensible – i.e. the learners should be able to access 95 % of it without resorting to the use of dictionaries or other resources.
it has to be highly patterned and repetitive – i.e. the text(s) ought to contain as many occurrences as possible of the target phonological, lexical and structural patterns –…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2A1eg5s

On the very questionable value of error correction at intermediate level (as commonly practised) | Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Applied Linguistics), MA (TEFL), MA (English Lit.), PGCE (Modern Languages and P.E.)

We are language teachers for a reason: language learning is important to us; it is one of our primary foci in life, hence we pay attention to corrections, they are salient to us.

However, this may not be the case for most of our students. Many of the corrections we feed them, unless we make them very distinctive and they are easy to remember, will be forgotten at a ridiculously high rate (nearly 70% of the information decaying from Long-Term Memory within 9 hours from processing it).

What baffles me is how often some teachers seem to forget  that grammar correction is a form of…

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http://ift.tt/2ySNn3f

On the very questionable value of error correction at intermediate level (as commonly practised) | Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Applied Linguistics), MA (TEFL), MA (English Lit.), PGCE (Modern Languages and P.E.)

We are language teachers for a reason: language learning is important to us; it is one of our primary foci in life, hence we pay attention to corrections, they are salient to us.

However, this may not be the case for most of our students. Many of the corrections we feed them, unless we make them very distinctive and they are easy to remember, they will be forgotten at a ridiculously high rate (nearly 70% of the information decaying from Long-Term Memory within 9 hours from processing it).

Correction is a form of instruction. Like instruction it does one or more of the following:…

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Are they truly ready to write that essay? – Challenges and solutions for your struggling intermediate student-writers (Part 1) | Gianfranco Conti, Phd (Applied Linguistics), MA (TEFL), MA (English Lit.), PGCE (Modern Languages and P.E.)

Introduction

So your students are writing fairly long essays in the target language, but there are lots of mistakes in them, mistakes they often can self-correct when you point them out to them. A lot of mistakes are recurrent ones; they relate to things that you have ‘taught’ them over and over again in lessons and through your feedback and you have spent a lot of time drilling in; things like forgetting to make adjectives and nouns agree; wrong conjugations of verbs; omission or overuse of the definite article; wrong word order; omission of plural endings.

You are frustrated because you…

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http://ift.tt/2gKh8IX