Interleaving and Curriculum Design | Martin Robinson

Curriculum Shorts (Some short musings about curriculum)

Interleaving two or more pieces of curriculum content that are deliberately chosen as they juxtapose well and/or offer interesting viewpoints and perspectives, and arguments can work really well. When I teach drama I interleave the three practitioners Brecht, Stanislavsky and Artaud. I start by looking at how each has a different view about truth and its representation and then look at how their ideas compare and contrast theoretically and practically. As they are studied alongside each other, pupils get a much richer view of…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2PDtEsS

Advertisements

Curriculum Design and Spacing | Martin Robinson

Curriculum Shorts (Some short musings about curriculum)

‘Spacing’ is a really useful way to improve learning and retention. Basically it means delaying before you re-study something. The opposite would be ‘blocking’, where a topic is learned over a period of a few weeks. This is a curriculum design issue as, often, teachers and departments design their curriculum around half-termly chunks.

This tends to mean that by the time, say, the class get to their mock GCSE-exam in a given subject the vast majority of pupils have little recall about the knowledge they ‘learnt’ in the first Autumn…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2zVdvK6

Spiral Curriculum | Martin Robinson

Curriculum Shorts (Some short musings about curriculum)

In his book, The Process of Education, Jerome Bruner wrote that:

‘A curriculum as it develops should revisit… basic ideas repeatedly, building upon them until the student has grasped the full formal apparatus that goes with them’

This idea was central to the spiral curriculum. It should also be central to any knowledge-rich approach to education today. In every subject there are ideas, concepts – foundational knowledge upon which a subject studied is built. (Some examples: Empire and Colonialism, Revolution, Drawing, Painting,…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2EehAfv

Curriculum Design and Spacing | Martin Robinson

Curriculum Shorts (Some short musings about curriculum)

‘Spacing’ is a really useful way to improve learning and retention. Basically it means delaying before you re-study something. The opposite would be ‘blocking’, where a topic is learned over a period of a few weeks. This is a curriculum design issue as, often, teachers and departments design their curriculum around half-termly chunks.

This tends to mean that by the time, say, the class get to their mock GCSE-exam in a given subject the vast majority of pupils have little recall about the knowledge they ‘learnt’ in the first Autumn…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2zVdvK6

Spiral Curriculum | Martin Robinson

Curriculum Shorts (Some short musings about curriculum)

In his book, The Process of Education, Jerome Bruner wrote that:

‘A curriculum as it develops should revisit… basic ideas repeatedly, building upon them until the student has grasped the full formal apparatus that goes with them’

This idea was central to the spiral curriculum. It should also be central to any knowledge-rich approach to education today. In every subject there are ideas, concepts, foundational ideas and knowledge upon which a subject studied is built. (Some examples: Empire and Colonialism, Revolution, Drawing,…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2EehAfv

T-Shaped Curriculum | Martin Robinson

Curriculum Shorts (Some short musings about curriculum)

The T-Shaped curriculum idea can be thought of, quite simply, in this way: the horizontal line of the T represents breadth and the vertical, depth.

The concept is prevalent in design education and also in other ‘progressive’ scenarios with breadth sometimes representing employability and/or multiple intelligences and the vertical as subject expertise. The horizontal line can be seen as transferable skills and the vertical as knowledge and experience. 

Without overcomplicating it, and instead by sticking to the competing notions…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2B4O0G5

T-Shaped Curriculum | Martin Robinson

Curriculum Shorts (Some short musings about curriculum)

The T-Shaped curriculum idea can be thought of, quite simply, in this way: the horizontal line of the T represents breadth and the vertical, depth.

The concept is prevalent in design education and also in other ‘progressive’ scenarios with breadth sometimes representing employability and/or multiple intelligences and the vertical as subject expertise. The horizontal line can be seen as transferable skills and the vertical as knowledge and experience. 

Without overcomplicating it, and instead by sticking to the competing notions…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2B4O0G5