On Knowing and Knowledge – the bubble in the sky | nancy

You might not know, but I have another, more directly teaching blog ( http://ift.tt/2vPAG85 ) and I have toyed with the idea of writing this post for that blog, as it is about a debate on knowledge and the organisation of it, that rumbles on through the teacher summer holidays, but as I want to approach it through the lens of motherhood, I thought, what they heck, I’ll put it here.

Blogs on knowledge organisers can be found here:

The highs and lows of knowledge organisers: an end of year report

http://ift.tt/2vPy4qq…

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http://ift.tt/2uAs6pK

Strategies for Spelling | nancy

I’m not going to go into a great deal of detail in this post about the teaching of spelling (there is book loads of things to be said about the subject, after all); I am going to share with you some simple tips that have worked for me in helping most children achieve spelling success in the primary classroom.

To be a good speller you need to have had lots of exposure to words, and have a good idea about how they work, in terms of their construction, history and meaning.  You need to have a good memory, and, certainly in school, good fine motor control (so that when you write the words down,…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2vGQTeZ

Strategies for Spelling | nancy

I’m not going to go into a great deal of detail in this post about the teaching of spelling (there is book loads of things to be said about the subject, after all); I am going to share with you some simple tips that have worked for me in helping most children achieve spelling success in the primary classroom.

To be a good speller you need to have had lots of exposure to words, and have a good idea about how they work, in terms of their construction, history and meaning.  You need to have a good memory, and, certainly in school, good fine motor control (so that when you write the words down,…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2vGQTeZ

Useful Equipment | nancy

It’salways tempting to spend a large proportion of your own money on decking out your classroom in the latest educational bunting (don’t feel bad, we all do it); teachers are territorial beings and we love to make a mark on our own little kingdoms.  BUT, and this is a big but, it is a dangerous path to tread.  Before you know where you are, you will be heavily subsidising the education system (don’t worry, we’ve all done that too), so in order to save you running out of money I have put together a list of teaching essentials, that is, things that you really are better off owning yourself….

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http://ift.tt/2v02Bix

Useful Equipment | nancy

It’salways tempting to spend a large proportion of your own money on decking out your classroom in the latest educational bunting (don’t feel bad, we all do it); teachers are territorial beings and we love to make a mark on our own little kingdoms.  BUT, and this is a big but, it is a dangerous path to tread.  Before you know where you are, you will be heavily subsidising the education system (don’t worry, we’ve all done that too), so in order to save you running out of money I have put together a list of teaching essentials, that is, things that you really are better off owning yourself….

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2v02Bix

Useful Routines | nancy

Being a teacher has a lot to do with a lot of things; knowing your subject, being able to communicate and explain it, and being able to organise your time, and large numbers of children.  In fact, organising things and people could be said to take up a very large amount of every teacher’s time, so getting things and people from where they are to where you want them to be with as little bother as possible is worth thinking about.

Rather than giving you examples of routines you might use in your classroom, I thought I would distil them into principles, so that you can apply them for…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2vc76IS

Useful Routines | nancy

Being a teacher has a lot to do with a lot of things; knowing your subject, being able to communicate and explain it, and being able to organise your time, and large numbers of children.  In fact, organising things and people could be said to take up a very large amount of every teacher’s time, so getting things and people from where they are to where you want them to be with as little bother as possible is worth thinking about.

Rather than giving you examples of routines you might use in your classroom, I thought I would distil them into principles, so that you can apply them for…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2vc76IS