Language Latte podcasts | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

Happy to share this with you all. After recently plugging the #MFLTwitteratiPodcast from Joe Dale and Noah Geisel, here’s another one I’ve come across: Language Latte from Becky Morales. The topics have an American bias to them, but UK teachers should get lots of ideas from the wide range of topics covered. Each episode of around 30 minutes has a theme and an interview with a teacher. The podcasts are accompanied by quite detailed show notes with references for further follow-up.

Recent episodes have looked at: using video for creating lessons with lots of comprehensible input, using photos…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2SxB32X

Advertisements

Interaction in second language learning (Part 2) | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

This is the follow-up blog to my previous one summarising Chapter 6 of the book Second language Learning Theories by Mitchell, Myles and Marsden (2013).

So where were we?

The authors go on to look at the Output Hypothesis (Swain) and the role of prompts in corrective feedback. This hypothesis from Merril Swain’s work with Canadian students learning L2 French through content-based teaching. Although these students developed comprehension abilities close to their native speaker counterparts, their productive abilities were less convincing. Swain assumed this was because they were largely…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2SUAwrz

Students’ perceptions of the motivational pull of TPRS | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

Spanish teacher Liam Printer, a keen practitioner of the TPRS approach, kindly sent me a copy of a paper he has had published in The Language Learning Journal (January, 2019). Liam works at an international, English-medium secondary school in Switzerland and he carried out his research with his own pupils. He wanted to focus on the motivational nature of TPRS, seen through the prism of a particular model of motivation called SDT (Self-Determination Theory). Let me concisely summarise his very clearly written paper, then add one or two reflections of my own.

To teachers with little or no…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2N3fW2J

Students’ perceptions of the motivational pull of TPRS | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

Spanish teacher Liam Printer, a keen practitioner of the TPRS approach, kindly sent me a copy of a paper he has had published in The Language Learning Journal (January, 2019). Liam works at an international, English-medium secondary school in Switzerland and he carried out his research with his own pupils. He wanted to focus on the motivational nature of TPRS, seen through the prism of a particular model of motivation called SDT (Self-Determination Theory). Let me concisely summarise his very clearly written paper, then add one or two reflections of my own.

To teachers with little or no…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2N3fW2J

Interaction in second language learning (Part 1) | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

This is the first of two posts summarising Chapter 6 of the book Second Language Learning Theories, by Mitchell, Myles and Marsden (Routledge, 3rd edition, 2013).

The authors begin by reminding us of the obvious fact using a second language is beneficial for learning it. Yet some people who are exposed for many years to a second language still make mistakes when using it. In the late 1970s Krashen hypothesised that receiving comprehensible input is all you need to acquire a language (the “Input Hypothesis”). Subsequently in the 1980s Michael Long, while accepting Stephen Krashen’s basic…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2WWnfxG

Exploiting listening texts with modelling in mind, not testing | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

One of the staples of language lessons is the listening lesson based around an extract of audio or video text. With a focus on comprehension, common ways of exploiting such material are by setting tasks such as:

– True/false/not mentioned
– Tick the correct statements
– Multiple choice questions in L1 or L2
– Questions in L1 or L2

These are all well and good if the focus is on testing comprehension. Such activities can be frequently found in text books which are often written with a particular assessment regime in mind, e.g. the GCSE examination in parts of the UK. But if you would like to…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2S7LmKY

The curse of single word vocab learning | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

I’m not generally one to go around criticising what teachers do. If you read my blogs you’ll know that I believe many things work if they’re done well. Success is often in the quality of delivery. But one thing which gives me repeated cause for concern is the time pupils spend on learning individual words. This can be in the form of traditional printed book lists or by the slightly snazzier means of apps such as Memrise, Vocab Express or Quizlet.

You see, the research on vocabulary acquisition suggests to us that, while explicitly learning islated words can be useful, it’s not the MOST…

Continue reading at:

http://bit.ly/2FzS9qd