Latest resources from frenchteacher | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

I’ve been pretty busy in the new year adding new resources to the site. I’ve reached the point now, I think, when I need to weed some older, less used resources to avoid the site becoming too unwieldy and difficult to search.

I am grateful to teachers and tutors who let me know if a link has gone dead, e.g. on my video listening worksheets. I also welcome fresh ideas or requests for particular resources. For example, one teacher recently asked if I could add more on the theme of the second world war, occupation and resistance in France. I have added a new text and exercises and a video…

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Three ways to practise reading aloud | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

Having students read aloud in class meets with varying reactions from teachers. Some have been trained to avoid it all together, based on the idea that it is embarrassing for students, is often done badly and does little to assist language acquisition. Others believe the activity has value, allowing students to practise pronunciation and intonation, providing an alternative to the teacher’s voice and helping students embed knowledge of language through their “phonological memories”.

I was not at all averse to giving pupils the opportunity to do some reading aloud for the reasons given above….

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A 15 questions game for practising jobs vocabulary | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

This is a variation of the classic 20 Questions game (animal, vegetable, mineral – you remember the one?) Partner A thinks of a thing and partner B has to work it out by asking Yes/No questions. It’s a really good oral fluency games for relatively advanced learners.

My version here relates to job vocabulary. Assuming you have taught, say, 25 jobs using word lists, pictures, definitions, written and spoken texts and so on, let’s say you want to embed this knowledge a week or two later, this is what you could do.

Partner A chooses a job which has been learned. Partner B is given a list of 15…

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ELT Research Bites | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

If you have an interest in research into second language acquisition but don’t have the time, money or need to look at original journal articles, you may like this very good site which contains articles about notable research issues in the field. ELT Research Bites.

In their own words:

“The purpose of ELT Research Bites is to present interesting and relevant language and education research in an easily digestible format. Academic journal articles and research reports tend to be long, perhaps even long-winded. And rightfully so – there is a lot of theoretical and often statistical work that…

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Google Translate beaters | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

Google Translate is a really useful tool, but some teachers say that they have stopped setting written work to be done at home because students are cheating by using it. On a number of occasions I have seen teachers asking what tasks can be set which make the use of Google Translate hard or impossible. Having given this some thought I have come up with one possible Google Translate-beating task type. It’s a two way gapped translation exercise where students have to complete gaps in two parallel texts, one in French, one in English. There are no complete sentences which can be copied and…

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Plans for 2018 | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

When I retired from teaching in 2012 I never thought that I would remain so busy in the field of language teaching. Since that time I have authored or co-authored two books, written over 10 blogs a month about language teaching, written and frequently presented for the AQA exam board, taught PGCE students at York and latterly Buckingham University, produced hundreds of resources for frenchteacher.net and taken part in a number of MFL teacher conferences, including three for ISMLA, two for the Chartered College of Teaching, and one for ResearchEd.

I can’t seem to take my mind off language…

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What is “Input Processing”? | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Smith)

Input Processing (IP) was proposed by Bill VanPatten, Professor of Spanish and Second Language Acquisition from Michigan State University. Bill may be known to some of you from his podcast show Tea with BVP. He is one of those rare university academics who makes a specific effort to engage with practising teachers.

IP was first proposed in a 1993 article (published with T. Cadierno in the Modern Language Journal) entitled “Input processing and second language acquisition: A role for instruction.” My summary of it is based on an article “Input Processing and Processing Instruction:…

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