The New Education #bookreview | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Wheeler)

Image from Carpe DiemI was sent a pre-publication copy of Cathy Davidson’s new book The New Education recently, to review. Cathy is one of my favourite authors because she pulls no punches and writes in a style that challenges and encourages in equal measure. She is a doyen of the progressive education movement, and her ideas are far reaching and influential.

The strapline for Davidson’s latest book is ‘how to revolutionize the university to prepare students for a world in flux.’ It’s one that many, many academics can identify with across the globe, because higher education is generally in a…

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Surviving higher education: 7 top tips | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Wheeler)

Image from PixabayHere are top 7 survival tips for working in higher education (or for that matter, any profession).

1. When I first started work, one wise old colleague told me that wherever I went, I should always carry a piece of paper around with me. It didn’t matter what was on the paper. It could even be blank. He told me it would made people think I was busier than I actually was. He was fired.

2. If you don’t want to be in a boring meeting, you can set the alarm on your smartphone to go off exactly 7 minutes in. Look embarrassed, make your excuses with ‘I’m sorry, I have to take…

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Balancing act | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Wheeler)

Image from National Photo Library on FlickrAs my colleagues at Plymouth Institute of Education make their way back to work, and I sit gazing, relaxed (and retired) from the sidelines, I have mixed emotions. I am happy that I no longer need to worry about timetables, module delivery sheets, digital learning environment content updates, online marking, exam boards, deadlines and more deadlines, but I’m also a little worried about how my colleagues will cope with ever increasing workloads, and the incessant emails and other digital content they have to wrestle with on a daily basis. It’s the…

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Grades of success and failure | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Wheeler)

Whatever happened to inspiration? Where does all of the excitement of early years education go when children progress to big school?

Schools often demonise failure – students failing exams, children failing tests and failing to attend classes. They wish to cover up failure and emphasis success – especially when the school inspectors pay a visit. And yet failure is often a prelude to good learning. We shouldn’t stigmatise it, but rather see it as a step in the right direction to future success. My two best teachers at school gave me permission to fail and then showed me how to do better next…

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Grades of success and failure | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Wheeler)

Whatever happened to inspiration? Where does all of the excitement of early years education go when children progress to big school?

Schools often demonise failure – students failing exams, children failing tests and failing to attend classes. They wish to cover up failure and emphasis success – especially when the school inspectors pay a visit. And yet failure is often a prelude to good learning. We shouldn’t stigmatise it, but rather see it as a step in the right direction to future success. My two best teachers at school gave me permission to fail and then showed me how to do better next…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2vgU1fA

Grades of success and failure | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Wheeler)

Whatever happened to inspiration? Where does all of the excitement of early years education go when children progress to big school?

Schools often demonise failure – students failing exams, children failing tests and failing to attend classes. They wish to cover up failure and emphasis success – especially when the school inspectors pay a visit. And yet failure is often a prelude to good learning. We shouldn’t stigmatise it, but rather see it as a step in the right direction to future success. My two best teachers at school gave me permission to fail and then showed me how to do better next…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2vgU1fA

Grades of success and failure | noreply@blogger.com (Steve Wheeler)

Whatever happened to inspiration? Where does all of the excitement of early years education go when children progress to big school?

Schools often demonise failure – students failing exams, children failing tests and failing to attend classes. They wish to cover up failure and emphasis success – especially when the school inspectors pay a visit. And yet failure is often a prelude to good learning. We shouldn’t stigmatise it, but rather see it as a step in the right direction to future success. My two best teachers at school gave me permission to fail and then showed me how to do better next…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2vgU1fA