Energy breaks for young learners | Sandy Millin

You’re teaching a group of young learners and they just won’t sit still, no matter how many times you tell them to. They can’t seem to concentrate on anything you want to do with them. What can you do about it?

Give them an energy break, of course!

Try some of these ideas to use up at least a bit of their energy.
Brain Breaks therapy – the first one in the video, ‘ear and nose’, is my go-to. Lots more on their blog.

20 three-minute brain breaks – a lot of these could be combined with revision of vocabulary
GoNoodle songs with movement (‘Purple Stew’ used to get stuck in my head…

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Energy breaks for young learners | Sandy Millin

You’re teaching a group of young learners and they just won’t sit still, no matter how many times you tell them to. They can’t seem to concentrate on anything you want to do with them. What can you do about it?

Give them an energy break, of course!

Try some of these ideas to use up at least a bit of their energy.
Brain Breaks therapy – the first one in the video, ‘ear and nose’, is my go-to. Lots more on their blog.

20 three-minute brain breaks – a lot of these could be combined with revision of vocabulary
GoNoodle songs with movement (‘Purple Stew’ used to get stuck in my head every…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2KDctH2

Bonus task: Self-talk and teacher confidence (ELT Playbook 1) | Sandy Millin

Here’s a bonus task to complement the ‘Teacher Health and Wellbeing’ section of ELT Playbook 1, a book I self-published this year which is designed to help early career teachers reflect on their teaching. Download the task as a pdf (Self-talk and teacher confidence), or read on…
Teacher health and wellbeing

Self-talk and teacher confidence

Task: 25 minutes
Reflection: 25 minutes

Make a list of things which you say to yourself about your teaching, for example ‘I can’t control this class’ or ‘That board race went really well’.

Categorise them into positive, negative and neutral….

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360 degree CPD (TeachingEnglish blog associates) | Sandy Millin

I’m very proud to be one of the TeachingEnglish associates, a group of wonderful English teachers from around the world. Each month a series of topics is posted on the blogs section of the British Council TeachingEnglish site, which everyone is invited to write about, including you! Anyone is welcome to join in. If you haven’t tried blogging before, why not give it a go? To inspire you, the associates offer their takes on the topics.

My most recent contribution is about combining being part of the online community (if you want to) and reflecting on what’s happening in your classroom….

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Delta conversations: Jenni | Sandy Millin

This is part of a series of posts showing you all the different ways you can approach the Cambridge Delta. They are designed to help you find out more about the course and what it involves, as well as helping you to choose the right way to do it for you, your lifestyle and the time you have available. If you’ve done the Delta (or any other similar higher-level teaching course, including a Masters), and you’d like to join in, let me know by leaving me a comment or contacting me via Twitter @sandymillin.
Jenni started teaching in Poland in 2014 following a CELTA from British Council Krakow….

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Teenagers losing their luggage | Sandy Millin

Today I taught two low-intermediate teen classes at the same level, covering for another teacher. The first half of the lesson was a test. The topic of one of the recent units they’ve done is travel, so I finally got the chance to try out Mike Astbury’s lost luggage activity, which I’ve been meaning to do for ages. The basic idea of Mike’s materials is that students role-play travellers who’ve lost their luggage and airport workers who take the details. Here’s what I did with it.
Setting the scene

You’re going on holiday. You’ve just arrived at the airport. Your luggage didn’t arrive….

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Typical problems for Polish learners of English | Sandy Millin

Here is a list of some of the things I have noticed students doing since I arrived in Poland three years ago. Caveats:
My numbers here are based on impressions – there is no formal research to back it up! If you want more scientific and in-depth information about problems which Polish learners have with English, look at pages 162-178 of Learner English: A teacher’s guide to interference and other problems edited by Michael Swan and Bernard Smith [affiliate link]. 
I realise that some of the things I’m correcting might not be in line with English as Lingua Franca, but they should be useful…

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