Creating a culture of innovation, part 3: Delegate | Terry Freedman

This is part 2 of a 10-part series.

Delegating lesson planning
I’m using the term ‘lesson planning’ as a kind of catch-all to include:coming up with a topicplanning how it will be taughtcreating or collating the necessary resourcescreating assessment materialsand running any extra training sessions for the rest of team, if necessary.
The suggestion of delegating lesson planning to other team members  lends itself to a project-based learning approach, but will work even if you have a different kind of scheme of…

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What next for ed tech in 2018? | Terry Freedman

This is a great time to be involved in education. The technology is amazing, allowing teachers to do things I could only dream of when I started my career. And furthermore, it’s changing all the time.
Not all of it is exciting (disruptive?) in a good way, of course. Or let’s say that some of it is, or is going to be, challenging.
To take a couple of obvious issues, what about AI, and what about GDPR?
Artificial Intelligence: is it really going to replace teachers at some point? I am optimistic about this. I have no doubt that AI is on the verge of becoming good enough in many respects to…

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What I’ve been reading: The Trouble With Women | Terry Freedman

Another book of cartoons, this time illustrating some of the things (famous) men have said about women. When I was reading about Ada Lovelace I found it quite appalling that in her days men thought women were too mentally fragile to cope with mathematics or science.
In this book, Jackie Fleming ridicules that kind of thinking, sometimes by repeating what people like Darwin said — she continually refers to Darwin and others as ‘geniuses’, and it becomes quite obvious fairly quickly that she does not quite regard them as geniuses when it comes to their ‘scientific’ conclusions about women….

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Creating a culture of innovation, part 2: Make The Professional Development Interesting | Terry Freedman

This is part 2 of a 10-part series.

I’m choosing my words carefully here. I use the word ‘interesting’ rather than useful or relevant because you cannot necessarily know in advance what is going to be useful or relevant. I have worked in several schools where in order to be considered to go on a training day or a conference you had to make sure it was ‘relevant’. I can see the sense in that, but another way of looking at it is to say that that approach keeps you inside a bubble. How can you be exposed to a…

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Creating a culture of innovation, part 1: Conferences and exhibitions | Terry Freedman

This is part 1 of a 10-part series.

Photo from pixabay.com CCO

Attending a conference or an exhibition can be a useful way of learning a lot quite quickly. At the time of writing this article, the Bett Show is coming up, as is the Education Innovation conference. Each of these will provide opportunities to think about innovation, and ideas about how to do so. I’ve written more about the Education Conference in the article Bett 2018 and other…

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Update of 7 Reasons to have an educational technology library | Terry Freedman

In my many visits to schools I have rarely seen a book library which has been built up and maintained by the teachers resposible for ICT, or educational technology as it is known in the USA.
There are several compelling reasons for starting such an enterprise. Indeed, not to do so is to implicitly agree with the utilitarian view of ICT being nothing more than a set of skills. Whenever you read an educationalist ‘s blog or a committee report espousing the view that ICT should be taught across the curriculum and has no place in the school timetable in its own right, you are ingesting the views…

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New Education Secretary: some thoughts | Terry Freedman

No. 10 Downing Street, where it all happened. Photo is copyright of http://www.gov.uk.

Just as I was going to take a bit of a break from updating this website several times a week, in order to focus on a Bett guide, Bett preview and a couple of books, the Prime Minister decided to hold a cabinet reshuffle. So inconsiderate. Anyway, as part of that reshuffle, Justine Greening, the Education Secretary, resigned. She has been replaced by Damian Hinds.
I liked Justine Greening for two reasons. First, she struck me as someone who…

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