Do the children know what we’re going on about? | The Quirky Teacher

This blog post is about edu-lingo and it’s probably the one of the few times I will make a concession to the whole ‘child-centred’ thing. Now is a good time to write because I still feel sort of new to the profession (even though it’s been a few years now) and the initial ‘What is … Continue reading Do the children know what we’re going on about?

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In defence of the anecdote | The Quirky Teacher

Every now and then I catch a vibe on edu-media that seems to imply that ordinary people shouldn’t take part in discussion or venture opinions because: They’re not ‘professionals’ (i.e well-known enough) They’re not ‘qualified’ enough (i.e possess strings of letters after their names) Their ‘evidence’ for their opinion, even though they may cite additional […]

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In defence of the anecdote | The Quirky Teacher

Every now and then I catch a vibe on edu-media that seems to imply that ordinary people shouldn’t take part in discussion or venture opinions because: They’re not ‘professionals’ (i.e well-known enough) They’re not ‘qualified’ enough (i.e possess strings of letters after their names) Their ‘evidence’ for their opinion, even though they may cite additional … Continue reading In defence of the anecdote

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The big taboo in maths: tolerating the bad sports and destroying the confidence of the nerds | The Quirky Teacher

Having written recently about Dr J. Boaler’s views on memorisation of maths facts and the usefulness of timed tests, something was still niggling and I couldn’t help but think a bit more about my and Boaler’s motivation: why would a respected professor of mathematics education use citations that don’t back up her statements? It seems […]

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The big taboo in maths: tolerating the bad sports and destroying the confidence of the nerds | The Quirky Teacher

Having written recently about Dr J. Boaler’s views on memorisation of maths facts and the usefulness of timed tests, something was still niggling and I couldn’t help but think a bit more about my and Boaler’s motivation: why would a respected professor of mathematics education use citations that don’t back up her statements? It seems … Continue reading The big taboo in maths: tolerating the bad sports and destroying the confidence of the nerds

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Jo Boaler is wrong about maths facts and timed tests | The Quirky Teacher

This is a blog post about how I believe Jo Boaler is wrong when she asserts that learning maths facts off by heart and timed tests are detrimental to children’s well-being and mathematical ability. I’ve tried to take the time to read pretty much every piece of research she has linked to in her article […]

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Jo Boaler is wrong about maths facts and timed tests | The Quirky Teacher

This is a blog post about how I believe Jo Boaler is wrong when she asserts that learning maths facts off by heart and timed tests are detrimental to children’s well-being and mathematical ability. I’ve tried to take the time to read pretty much every piece of research she has linked to in her article […]

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2wAs1E3