What is ‘holistic evaluation’? | thelearningprofessor

I’ve been thinking recently about the idea of ‘holistic evaluation’, which you occasionally hear mentioned in lifelong learning. In assessment circles the term is used much more frequently, and appears to be used to describe an approach to assessing writing. The more general use of it to describe an approach to organisational or programme evaulation seems out to be quite rare, and e been my attempts to get to grips with it havrather unrevealing.

Quite a few authors seem happy to use the term in their titles and keywords without explaining what they mean by it. One author simply used the…

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http://ift.tt/2rHVtJa

What is ‘holistic evaluation’? | thelearningprofessor

I’ve been thinking recently about the idea of ‘holistic evaluation’, which you occasionally hear mentioned in lifelong learning. In assessment circles the term is used much more frequently, and appears to be used to describe an approach to assessing writing. The more general use of it to describe an approach to organisational or programme evaulation seems out to be quite rare, and e been my attempts to get to grips with it havrather unrevealing.

Quite a few authors seem happy to use the term in their titles and keywords without explaining what they mean by it. One author simply used the…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2rHVtJa

Adult learning and the election (5): the Democratic Unionist Party | thelearningprofessor

Judging by my Twitter feed, everyone in Britain is suddenly an expert on the Democratic Unionist Party. Theresa May’s decision to invite the DUP to support a minority Conservative government has got everyone interested in Northern Ireland politics – or at least in finding out enough to pour scorn on May’s new partners. But beyond the parody and fluff of social media, what does the DUP stand for?

I’m going to focus on one area and one area only: its policies for adult learning. I know all about the DUP’s social conservatism, its links with the Orange Order, and its support for Brexit….

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http://ift.tt/2rMTFgE

Adult learning and the election (5): the Democratic Unionist Party | thelearningprofessor

Judging by my Twitter feed, everyone in Britain is suddenly an expert on the Democratic Unionist Party. Theresa May’s decision to invite the DUP to support a minority Conservative government has got everyone interested in Northern Ireland politics – or at least in finding out enough to pour scorn on May’s new partners. But beyond the parody and fluff of social media, what does the DUP stand for?

I’m going to focus on one area and one area only: its policies for adult learning. I know all about the DUP’s social conservatism, its links with the Orange Order, and its support for Brexit….

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2rMTFgE

Adult learning and the election (4): a cheap and dirty poll | thelearningprofessor

In the last fortnight I’ve posted my summary analyses of the three main parties’ plans for adult learning. All three have had plenty to say, so for election day I’ve had a quick look at how many people took a look at each.

My chart shows the share of total readership for each party. Dear readers, you placed Labour ahead of the Conservatives, with the Liberal Democrats coming a clear third.  What do I read into this outcome? Not a lot, but I do find it mildly interesting.

In particular, I think you’ve been a bit tough on the Lib Dems, whose manifesto had some really interesting ideas…

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Organising a scholarly conference that engages the public | thelearningprofessor

Most learned society conferences are dull affairs, enlivened only by a handful of outstanding papers and the occasional spat. In my experience there is relatively little outrageously bad behaviour of the kind parodied by David Lodge, though I suppose there are plenty of minor put-downs. But they are closed and stuffy events, with a narrow audience of largely like-minded participants.

But not at Canada’s Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. These are large scale annual gatherings, which are hosted by a different university every year. As their name suggests, they are…

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http://ift.tt/2qXTs6o

Organising a scholarly conference that engages the public | thelearningprofessor

Most learned society conferences are dull affairs, enlivened only by a handful of outstanding papers and the occasional spat. In my experience there is relatively little outrageously bad behaviour of the kind parodied by David Lodge, though I suppose there are plenty of minor put-downs. But they are closed and stuffy events, with a narrow audience of largely like-minded participants.

But not at Canada’s Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. These are large scale annual gatherings, which are hosted by a different university every year. As their name suggests, they are…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2qXTs6o