Kids learn moral lessons more effectively from stories with humans than human-like animals | UKEdChat Editorial

A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto found that four to six-year-olds shared more after listening to books with human characters than books with anthropomorphic (human-like) animals.
The findings are noteworthy since so much of children’s media– books, movies, video games, etc.– use human-like animal characters. But since many children in this study did not see these characters as similar to themselves, researchers say they may be less likely to translate social lessons from these stories into their everyday lives….

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Students need additional support to conquer their career concerns, says AAT | UKEdChat Editorial

With A-Level results day finally arrived, new research from AAT (Association of Accounting Technicians) shows that the vast majority of 16-19 year olds (94%) are worried about making career decisions, such as choosing what job they want to do in the future or deciding on what to do after they leave school.
The top worry cited by young people is choosing the right job to suit them (27%), followed by not knowing what they want to do in the future (20%). This is despite it now being rare to have the same job or career for life. According to AAT research, the average person works for six…

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Children who skip breakfast may not be getting recommended nutrients | UKEdChat Editorial

A study by researchers at King’s College London has found that children who skip breakfast regularly may not be consuming the daily amounts of key nutrients for growth and development that are recommended by the UK government.
Children who ate breakfast every day were deemed to have overall superior nutritional profiles compared to those who didn’t. While the study was unable to identify a causal link, these children were found to have higher daily intakes of key nutrients such as folate (important for the development of genetic material), calcium, iron and iodine (key in the development of…

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Why teens take risks: It’s not a deficit in brain development | UKEdChat Editorial

A popular theory in recent neuroscience proposes that slow development of the prefrontal cortex – and its weak connectivity with brain reward regions – explains teenagers’ seemingly impulsive and risky behaviour. But an extensive literature review to be published in the journal Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience challenges that interpretation.
The researchers examined the evidence behind that argument and found that much of it misinterpreted adolescent exploratory behaviour as impulsive and lacking in control. Instead, the review suggests that much of what looks like adolescent impulsivity…

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Session 367: Students and Social Media | UKEdChat Editorial

There is no avoiding it. Social media is here, very popular, and there appears to be no abating with how people swarm to the multitude of platforms all vying for our attention, all for the sake of connecting with other people.
Pupils currently within the education system have grown up at the same time as social media platforms, and are familiar with the latest trends, platforms, and behaviour expected as they broadcast themselves to the world. So, how can educators support the students during this expansion of social media?
Following the online poll, #UKEdChat this week will explore ideas,…

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Child’s home learning environment predicts 5th grade academic skills | UKEdChat Editorial

Children whose parents provide them with learning materials like books and toys and engage them in learning activities and meaningful conversations in infancy and toddlerhood are likely to develop early cognitive skills that can cascade into later academic success, finds a new study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
The study, published online in the journal Applied Developmental Science, followed a group of children from birth through 5th grade to track the influence of early home learning environments on later cognitive skills and understand the…

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Mental health programmes in schools — Growing body of evidence supports effectiveness | UKEdChat Editorial

School-based mental health programs can reach large numbers of children, with increasing evidence of effectiveness in improving mental health and related outcomes, according to a research review in the September/October issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
“This review provides evidence that large-scale, school-based programs can be implemented in a variety of diverse cultures and educational models as well as preliminary evidence that such programs have significant, measurable positive effects on students’ emotional, behavioural, and…

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