UKEdMag: Effective Educators Engage Imagination by @perfinker | UKEdChat Editorial

My advice to all educators: Don’t shoot yourself in the foot.
This is, of course, a fairly gruesome way of saying “don’t do something without intending to which spoils a situation for yourself” (Cambridge English Dictionary).
This article originally appeared in the May 2017 edition of the UKEdChat Magazine – Click here to view
I offer this advice to all educators who neglect imagination. If you are an educator who feels that in your subject area, learning context, or specialisation, there simply isn’t time or space for imagination, you may unknowingly be limiting the effectiveness of your…

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Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk | UKEdChat Editorial

New research has shown that the youngest pupils in each school year group could be at risk of worse mental health than their older classmates.
Starting school young is an exciting but sometimes challenging milestone for children and their families. Some children will be nearing their fifth birthday as they enter foundation classes while others will be only just four.
Now, a study led by the University of Exeter Medical School which investigated more than 2,000 children across 80 primary schools in Devon, has found that children who are younger than their peers when they start school are…

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Underprivileged teenagers more likely to give up their university ambitions | UKEdChat Editorial

Early intervention to maintain and raise expectations could increase the number of teenagers from less privileged backgrounds entering university, finds a new study by the UCL Institute of Education (IOE).
The research, published in the Oxford Review of Education, analysed how young people’s expectations of applying to university change between the ages of 14 and 17, finding that those from less advantaged backgrounds were more likely to stop, and less likely to start or consider applying, than their more advantaged peers. This was true even when comparing individuals with the same test…

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Screen time or story time? | UKEdChat Editorial

Pediatrician’s, educators, and parents have always agreed on at least one thing: reading to your toddler – early on in life and regularly – is vital to promote language acquisition and also an enthusiasm for learning.
But does it make a difference if parents read from traditional print books, or for parents and kids to engage with electronic books? This ongoing debate has seen several studies in recent years, but there are still many unanswered questions.
A new study conducted by Gabrielle A. Strouse of the School of Education at the University of South Dakota in the U.S.A., and Patricia A….

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UKEdMag: The Power of Positivity by @Mroberts90Matt | UKEdChat Editorial

Positivity: In 2014, an eager primary education student was introduced to a brand new world. I was finishing my last year of Initial Teacher Training and I was encouraged to join Twitter to engage with other professionals. What I was welcomed with was a vast horizon of conscientious, inspirational and outstanding practitioners. Unfortunately, I slipped off the radar around the start of my RQT Year due to workload demands but have been back since January 2017.
This article originally appeared in the May 2017 edition of UKEdChat magazine – Click here to view
However, something is different….

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Session 359: Online Professionalism | UKEdChat Editorial

Maintaining professionalism as an educator now demands 24-hour attention, as the professionalism demanded now includes the online worlds that many habituate.
Whether publishing resources online, partaking in social media conversations, or offering advice within forums all now require a level of professionalism, as the audiences intended can sometimes be different than initially considered.
Following the online poll, this #UKEdChat session will explore the professional considerations teachers need to explore when comments or posting online. In particular, the session will ask:
What are the…

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Older dads have ‘geekier’ sons | UKEdChat Editorial

New King’s College London research suggests that sons of older fathers are more intelligent, more focused on their interests and less concerned about fitting in, all characteristics typically seen in ‘geeks’.
While previous research has shown that children of older fathers are at a higher risk of some adverse outcomes, including autism and schizophrenia, this new study published today in Translational Psychiatry suggests that children of older fathers may also have certain advantages over their peers in educational and career settings.
The researchers from King’s College London and The…

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