Thinking Aloud | warrenvalentine

What do we want students to know about the middle ages?

My review of what I teach about the middle ages continues at a glacial pace. There are so many different angles from which to approach curriculum planning it is hard to settle down and make a start.

Michael Fordham Fordham suggests that one approach might include generating a list of essay style-questions. Perhaps 100 for Key-Stage Three. What might these questions read, uniquely, for the Middle Ages? I concur with Fordham that there needs to be a transition between the Middle Ages and the developing ‘Early Modern’ period post-1485….

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2okXl4E

Thinking Aloud | warrenvalentine

What do we want students to know about the middle ages?

My review of what I teach about the middle ages continues at a glacial pace. There are so many different angles from which to approach curriculum planning it is hard to settle down and make a start.

Michael Fordham Fordham suggests that one approach might include generating a list of essay style-questions. Perhaps 100 for Key-Stage Three. What might these questions read, uniquely, for the Middle Ages? I concur with Fordham that there needs to be a transition between the Middle Ages and the developing ‘Early Modern’ period post-1485….

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2mEsSSu

Using Comparative Judgement | warrenvalentine

Some practical reflections on its use in practice

I was first made aware of Comparative Judgement as a method of assessment last year, through one of David Didau’s informative blogposts. I had always meant to get around to using it, but was put off by a fear of using technology. I have regularly compared scripts when awarding marks, and have on occasion sought to put together some sort of order before being brought back to the use of nomoremarking.com by my Deputy Head, and fellow A-level history teacher, to mark some Y12 mock essays.

Having had some new, functional photocopiers installed…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2nYGunV

Using Comparative Judgement | warrenvalentine

Some practical reflections on its use in practice

I was first made aware of Comparative Judgement as a method of assessment last year, through one of David Didau’s informative blogposts. I had always meant to get around to using it, but was put off by a fear of using technology. I have regularly compared scripts when awarding marks, and have on occasion sought to put together some sort of order before being brought back to the use of nomoremarking.com by my Deputy Head, and fellow A-level history teacher, to mark some Y12 mock essays.

Having had some new, functional photocopiers installed…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2mJbVBM

Why should we share the work of academic historians? | warrenvalentine

Rachel Foster’s attendance at the WLFS history conference stirred a rather interesting discussion within my own department about the role of academic history in the classroom. Inspired by Foster’s talk, her excellent chapter in Debates in History Teaching, discussions with fellow participants of my MA and our own fertile minds we devised a list of why using academic history in the classroom is valuable. In no particular order, we suggested:
To provide the narrative. Historians can compel the interest of students in ways that perhaps we cannot.
To provide competing interpretations.*
To…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2m7sitj

Why should we share the work of academic historians? | warrenvalentine

Rachel Foster’s attendance at the WLFS history conference stirred a rather interesting discussion within my own department about the role of academic history in the classroom. Inspired by Foster’s talk, her excellent chapter in Debates in History Teaching, discussions with fellow participants of my MA and our own fertile minds we devised a list of why using academic history in the classroom is valuable. In no particular order, we suggested:
To provide the narrative. Historians can compel the interest of students in ways that perhaps we cannot.
To provide competing interpretations.*
To…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2mZxOx2

Where can I read about the WLFS History Conference? | warrenvalentine

 
The Twitter hashtag #WLFSHistory
My Blog!
My review of Christine Counsell’s opener.
My review of the WLFS approach and Jim Carroll’s session.
My review of Vartan Tamizian’s session on historical narratives, and Robert Tombs’ closing lecture.

Other valuable blogs on the WLFS Conference:

Lee Donaghy has an exceptional reflection here, which is valuable in picking apart some of the individual workshops and the ‘revolutionary’ idea from Michael Fordham that the curriculum is the progression model.
Robert Peal’s discussion on the importance of knowledge, and how this message…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2luALWk